Parents have a new tool to manage their child’s Type 1 diabetes

A new technology called Tidepool can now collect the blood sugar readings from the child’s insulin pump, regular continuous glucose monitoring tests and measurements from activity trackers like FitBit and upload them to the cloud. It will allow parents and doctors to obtain reports that see patterns in a child’s insulin levels connected to sport, birthday parties, eating times and restaurant visits allowing them to better predict how much insulin a child will need around these events. The initiative is the work of a group of interested parents in Australia who have formed a not for profit organisation, Tidepool, to get diabetes device manufacturers to release their data so it can be shared with data from other device companies

Currently none of these devices speak to each other and trying to cross references reports from them can be time consuming and confusing.

Eventually the information will allow parents to be alerted via a watch or a mobile phone when their child’s blood sugar readings are crashing so they can intervene and correct the problem.

And experts hope it could advance the development of an artificial pancreas where a continuous glucose monitor could be linked to an insulin pump and automatically adjust a patients insulin levels as required.

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation is enthusiastically working with Tidepool to progress the new technology.

“Anything that makes the management of such a difficult disease easier is a great benefit,” JDRF chief executive Mike Wilson said

The initiative is the work of a group of interested parents who have formed a not for profit organisation, Tidepool, to get diabetes device manufacturers to release their data so it can be shared with data from other device companies. Many of the parents are also part of a worldwide group of parents who have developed another Do It Yourself tool that alerts their mobile phones if their child’s blood sugar is crashing.

Together with computer engineers in the United States they have developed Nightscout which sends real time readings from their child’s a Dexcom continuous glucose monitor to a parents mobile phone.

Around 20 Australian parents are believed to be using the system but because it’s a DIY project in the early stages, parents still need to check their children at night.

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Above is the new technology NightScout Watch